Always Be Shipping – Expect the Unexpected

Normal releases are consistent and predictable. Scheduled releases benefit developers, testers, support and PR. Unpredictable releases can cause communication problems, stress and fatigue. Those can lead to poor software quality and developer turn-over.

Sometimes we need to deal with unexpected issues that can’t wait for a normal release. Some examples include:

  • High volume crashes
  • Broken functionality
  • Security issues
  • Special date-based features

Anyone should be able to suggest an off-cycle release, so make sure there’s a straightforward, simple process for doing it. Identify that a special release is really necessary. Maybe the issue can wait for the next normal release. Consider using an approval process to decide if the release is warranted. An approval process creates a small hurdle that forces some justification. An off-cycle release is not cheap and has potential to derail the normal release process. Don’t put the normal release cycle at risk.

Some things to keep in mind:

  • Clearly identify the need. If you can’t, you probably don’t need the release.
  • Limit the scope of work to just what needs to be done for the issue. Be laser focused.
  • Make sure the work can be completed within the shortened cycle. Otherwise, just let the work happen in the normal release flow.
  • Choose an owner to drive the release and a set of stakeholders that need to track the release.
  • Triage frequently to make sure the short cycle stays on track. Over-communicate.
  • Test and verify the code changes. By limiting the scope, you should also be limiting the amount of required testing.

Be ready for the unexpected. Get really good at it. The best releases are boring releases.

Always Be Shipping

We all want to ship as fast as possible, while making sure we can control the quality of our product. Continuous deployment means we can ship at any time, right? Well, we still need to balance the unstable and stable parts of the codebase.

Web Deploys vs Application Deploys

The ability to control changes in your stable codebase is usually the limiting factor in how quickly and easily you can ship your product to people. For example, web products can ship frequently because it’s somewhat easy to control the state of the product people are using. When something is updated on the website, users get the update when loading the content or refreshing the page. With mobile applications, it can be harder to control the version of the product people are using. After pushing an update to the store, people need to update the application on their devices. This takes time and it’s disruptive. It’s typical for several versions of a mobile application to be active at any given time.

It’s common for mobile application development to use time-based deployment windows, such as 2 or 4 weeks. Every few weeks, the unstable codebase is promoted to the stable codebase and tasks (features and bug fixes) which are deemed stable are made ready to deploy. Getting ready to deploy could mean running a short Beta, to test the release candidate with a larger, more varied, test group.

It’s important to remember, these deployment windows are not development sprints! They are merely opportunities to deploy stable code. Some features or bug fixes could take many weeks to complete. Once complete, the code can be deployed at the next window.

Tracking the Tasks

Just because you use 2 week deployment windows doesn’t mean you can really ship a quality product every 2 weeks. The deployment window is an artificial framework we create to add some structure to the process. At the core, we need to be able to track the tasks. What is a task? Let’s start with something that’s easy to visualize: a feature.

What work goes into getting a feature shipped?

  • Planning: Define and scope the work.
  • Design: Design the UI and experience.
  • Coding: Do the implementation. Iterate with designers & product managers.
  • Reviewing: Examine & run the code, looking for problems. Code is ready to land after a successful review. Otherwise, it goes back to coding to fix issues.
  • Testing: Test that the feature is working correctly and nothing broke in the process. Defects might require sending the work back to development.
  • Push to Stable: Once implemented, tested and verified, the code can be moved to the stable codebase.

In the old days, this was a waterfall approach. These days, we can use iterative, overlapping processes. A flow might crudely look like this:

feature-cycle

Each of these steps takes a non-zero amount of time. Some have to be repeated. The goal is to create a feature that has the desired behavior and at a known level of quality. Note that landing the code is not the final step. The work can only be called complete when it’s been verified as stable enough to ship.

Bug fixes are similar to features. The flow might look like this:

bug-cycle

Imagine you have many of these flows happening at the same time. Ongoing work happens on the unstable codebase. As work is completed, tested and verified at an expectable level of quality, it can be moved to the stable codebase. All work happens on the unstable codebase. Try very hard to keep work on the stable codebase to a minimum – usually disabling/enabling code or backing out unstable code.

Crash Landings

One practice I’ve seen happen on development teams is attempting to crash land code right before a deployment window. This is bad for a few reasons:

  • It forces many code reviews to happen simultaneously across the team, leading to delays since code review is an iterative cycle.
  • It forces large amounts of code to be merged during a short time period, likely leading to merge conflicts – leading to more delays.
  • It forces a lot of testing to happen at the same time, leading to backlogs and delays. Especially since testing, fixing and verifying is an iterative cycle.

The end result is anti-climatic for everyone: code landed at a deployment window is almost never shipped in the window. In fact, the delays caused by crash landing lead to a lot of code missing the deployment window.

crash-landing

Smooth Landings

A different approach is to spread out the code landings. Allow code reviews and testing/fixing cycles to happen in a more balanced manner. More code is verified as stable and can ship in the deployment window. Code that is not stable is disabled via build-time or runtime flags, or in extreme cases, backout out of the stable codebase.

smooth-landing

This balanced approach also reduces the stress that accompanies rushing code reviews and testing. The process becomes more predictable and even enjoyable. Teams thrive in healthy environments.

Once you get comfortable with deployment windows and sprints being very different things, you could even start getting more creative with deployments. Could you deploy weekly? I think it’s possible, but the limiting factor becomes your ability to create stable builds, test and verify those builds and submit those builds to the store. Yes, you still need to test the release candidates and react to any unexpected outcomes from the testing. Testing the release candidates with a larger group (Beta testing) will usually turn up issues not found in other testing. At larger scales, many things thought to be only hypothetical become reality and might need to be addressed. Allowing for this type of beta testing improves quality, but may limit how short a deployment window can be.

Remember, it’s difficult to undo or remove an unexpected issue from a mobile application user population. Users are just stuck with the problem until they get around to updating to a fixed version.

I’ve seen some companies use short deployment window techniques for internal test releases, so it’s certainly possible. Automation has to play a key role, as does tracking and triaging the bugs. Risk assessment is a big part of shipping software. Know your risks, ship your software.

Fun with Telemetry: Improving Our User Analytics Story

My last post talks about the initial work to create a real user analytics system based on the UI Telemetry event data collected in Firefox on Mobile. I’m happy to report that we’ve had much forward progress since then. Most importantly, we are no longer using the DIY setup on one of my Mac Minis. Working with the Mozilla Telemetry & Data team, we have a system that extracts data from UI Telemetry via Spark, imports the data into Presto-based storage, and allows SQL queries and visualization via Re:dash.

With data accessible via Re:dash, we can use SQL to focus on improving our analyses:

  • Track Active users, daily & monthly
  • Explore retention & churn
  • Look into which features lead to retention
  • Calculate user session length & event counts per session
  • Use funnel analysis to evaluate A/B experiments

loadurl-types

loadurl-retention-effect

dropoff-rate

Roberto posted about how we’re using Parquet, Presto and Re:dash to create an SQL based query and visualization system.

Fun with Telemetry: DIY User Analytics Lab in SQL

Firefox on Mobile has a system to collect telemetry data from user interactions. We created a simple event and session UI telemetry system, built on top of the core telemetry system. The core telemetry system has been mainly focused on performance and stability. The UI telemetry system is really focused on how people are interacting with the application itself.

Event-based data streams are commonly used to do user data analytics. We’re pretty fortunate to have streams of events coming from all of our distribution channels. I wanted to start doing different types of analyses on our data, but first I needed to build a simple system to get the data into a suitable format for hacking.

One of the best one-stop sources for a variety of user analytics is the Periscope Data blog. There are posts on active users, retention and churn, and lots of other cool stuff. The blog provides tons of SQL examples. If I could get the Firefox data into SQL, I’d be in a nice place.

Collecting Data

My first step is performing a little ETL (well, the E & T parts) on the raw data using Spark/Python framework for Mozilla Telemetry. I wanted to create two dataset:

  • clients: Dataset of the unique clients (users) tracked in the system. Besides containing the unique clientId, I wanted to store some metadata, like the profile creation date. (script)
  • events: Dataset of the event stream, associated to each client. The event data also has information about active A/B experiments. (script)

Building a Database

I installed Postgres on a Mac Mini (powerful stuff, I know) and created my database tables. I was periodically collecting the data via my Spark scripts and I couldn’t guarantee I wouldn’t re-collect data from the previous jobs. I couldn’t just bulk insert the data. I wrote some simple Python scripts to quickly import the data (clients & events), making sure not to create any duplicates.

fennec-telemetry-data

I decided to start with 30 days of data from our Nightly and Beta channels. Nightly was relatively small (~330K rows of events), but Beta was more significant (~18M rows of events).

Analyzing and Visualizing

Now that I had my data, I could start exploring. There are a lot of analysis/visualization/sharing tools out there. Many are commercial and have lots of features. I stumbled across a few open-source tools:

  • Airpal: A web-based query execution tool from Airbnb. Makes it easy to save and share SQL analysis queries. Works with Facebook’s PrestoDB, but doesn’t seem to create any plots.
  • Re:dash: A web-based query, visualization and collaboration tool. It has tons of visualization support. You can set it up on your own server, but it was a little more than I wanted to take on over a weekend.
  • SQLPad: A web-based query and visualization tool. Simple and easy to setup, so I tried using it.

Even though I wanted to use SQLPad as much as possible, I found myself spending most of my time in pgAdmin. Debugging queries, using EXPLAIN to make queries faster, and setting up indexes. It was easier in pgAdmin. Once I got the basic things figured out, I was able to more efficiently use SQLPad. Below are some screenshots using the Nightly data:

sqlpad-query

sqlpad-chart

Next Steps

Now that I have Firefox event data in SQL, I can start looking at retention, churn, active users, engagement and funnel analysis. Eventually, we want this process to be automated, data stored in Redshift (like a lot of other Mozilla data) and exposed via easy query/visualization/collaboration tools. We’re working with the Mozilla Telemetry & Data Pipeline teams to make that happen.

A big thanks to Roberto Vitillo and Mark Reid for the help in creating the Spark scripts, and Richard Newman for double-dog daring me to try this.

Firefox on Mobile: A/B Testing and Staged Rollouts

We have decided to start running A/B Testing in Firefox for Android. These experiments are intended to optimize specific outcomes, as well as, inform our long-term design decisions. We want to create the best Firefox experience we can, and these experiments will help.

The system will also allow us to throttle the release of features, called staged rollout or feature toggles, so we can monitor new features in a controlled manner across a large user base and a fragmented device ecosystem. If we need to rollback a feature for some reason, we’d have the ability to do that, quickly without needing people to update software.

Technical details:

  • Mozilla Switchboard is used to control experiment segmenting and staged rollout.
  • UI Telemetry is used to collect metrics about an experiment.
  • Unified Telemetry is used to track active experiments so we can correlate to application usage.

What is Mozilla Switchboard?

Mozilla Switchboard is based on Switchboard, an open source SDK for doing A/B testing and staged rollouts from the folks at KeepSafe. It connects to a server component, which maintains a list of active experiments.

The SDK does create a UUID, which is stored on the device. The UUID is sent to the server, which uses it to “bucket” the client, but the UUID is never stored on the server. In fact, the server does not store any data. The server we are using was ported to Node from PHP and is being hosted by Mozilla.

We decided to start using Switchboard because it’s simple, open source, has client code for Android and iOS, saves no data on the server and can be hosted by Mozilla.

Planning Experiments

The Mobile Product and UX teams are the primary drivers for creating experiments, but as is common on the Mobile team, ideas can come from anywhere. We have been working with the Mozilla Growth team, getting a better understanding of how to design the experiments and analyze the metrics. UX researchers also have input into the experiments.

Once Product and UX complete the experiment design, Development would land code in Firefox to implement the desired variations of the experiment. Development would also land code in the Switchboard server to control the configuration of the experiment: On what channels is it active? How are the variations distributed across the user population?

Since we use Telemetry to collect metrics on the experiments, the Beta channel is likely our best time period to run experiments. Telemetry is on by default on Nightly, Aurora and Beta; and Beta is the largest user base of those three channels.

Once we decide which variation of the experiment is the “winner”, we’ll change the Switchboard server configuration for the experiment so that 100% of the user base will flow through the winning variation.

Yes, a small percentage of the Release channel has Telemetry enabled, but it might be too small to be useful for experimentation. Time will tell.

What’s Happening Now?

We are trying to be very transparent about active experiments and staged rollouts. We have a few active experiments right now.

  • Onboarding A/B experiment with several variants.
  • Easy entry points for accessing History and Bookmarks on the main menu.
  • Experimenting with the awesomescreen behavior when displaying search results page.

You can always look at the Mozilla Switchboard configuration to see what’s happening. Over time, we’ll be adding support to Firefox for iOS as well.

Firefox on Mobile: Browser or App?

It seems common for people have the same expectations for browsers on Mobile as they do on Desktop. Why is that? I’d rather create a set of Mobile-specific expectations for a browser. Mobile is very application-centric and those applications play a large role in how people use devices. When defining what success means for Firefox on Mobile, we should be thinking about Firefox as an application, not as a browser.

Navigation

Let’s start with navigation. On Desktop, navigation typically starts in a browser. On Mobile, navigation starts on the device home screen. The home screen holds a collection of applications that provide a very task-based workflow. This means you don’t need a browser to do many tasks on Mobile. In fact, a browser is somewhat secondary – it’s where you can end up after starting in a task-specific application. That’s the opposite of Desktop.

One way we started to optimize for this situation is Tab Queues: A way to send content to Firefox, in the background, without leaving your current task/application.

Another way to fit into home screen navigation is to launch favorite websites directly from home screen icons. On Android, Chrome and Firefox have supported this feature for some time, but Google’s Progressive Web Apps initiative will push the concept forward.

If the home screen is the primary way to start navigation, we can add more entry points (icons) for specific Firefox features. We already have a Search activity and we also have access to Logins/Passwords. Both of those could be put on the home screen, if the user chooses, to allow faster access.

Unsurprisingly, a correlation between applications on the home screen and application usage was a key takeaway from a recent comScore study:

“App usage is a reflexive, habitual behavior where those occupying the best home screen real estate are used most frequently.”

Content and Tasks

Creating a path to success means looking for opportunities that we can leverage. Let’s look at analyst reports for situations where browsing is used more than applications on Mobile:

  • Accessing news and information sources
  • Research tasks and cross-brand product comparisons
  • Retail, travel and shopping tasks

If this is the type of content people access using browsers on Mobile, Firefox should be optimized to handle those tasks and workflows. It’s interesting to think about how we could leverage Firefox to create solutions for these opportunities.

What if we were building a native application that allowed you to subscribe to news, blogs and articles? Would we create a view specific to discovering content? Would we use your browsing history to help recommend content?

What if we were building a native application designed to make researching a topic or product easier? How is that different than a generic tabbed browser?

Some ideas might end up being separate applications themselves, using Firefox as a secondary activity. That keeps Firefox focused on the task of browsing and viewing content, while new applications handle other specific tasks and flows. Those applications might even end up on your home screen, if you want faster access.

Retention and Engagement

Mobile applications, including browsers, struggle with user retention. Studies show that people will try out applications an average of 4.5 times before abandoning.

Browsers have a larger reach than applications on Mobile, while applications are awesome at engagement. How does a browser increase engagement? Again, we should think like an application.

What if we were building a native application that could save links to content? What other features would we add? Maybe we’d add reminders so people wouldn’t forget about those recently saved, but never viewed, links to content. Browsers don’t do that, but applications certainly do.

What if we were building a native application that allowed people to view constantly changing news, sports or retail content? We could notify (or badge parts of the UI) when new content is available on favorite sites.

Metrics

We should be measuring Firefox as an application, and not a browser. Marketshare and pageviews, compared to the OS defaults (Safari and Chrome), may not be the best way to measure success. Why should we measure our success only against how the OS defaults view web content? Why not compare Firefox against other applications?

Research tells us that anywhere from 85% to 90% of smartphone time is spent in applications, leaving 15% to 10% of time spent in browsers. Facebook is leading the pack at 13%, but the percentages drop off to single digits quickly. There is certainly an opportunity to capitalize on that 15% to 10% slice of the pie. In fact, the slice probably ends up being bigger than 15%.

time-spent-us-apps-2014

Treating Firefox as an application means we don’t take on all applications, as a single category. It means we take them on individually, and I think we can create a pretty solid path to success under those conditions.

An Engineer’s Guide to App Metrics

Building and shipping a successful product takes more than raw engineering. I have been posting a bit about using Telemetry to learn about how people interact with your application so you can optimize use cases. There are other types of data you should consider too. Being aware of these metrics can help provide a better focus for your work and, hopefully, have a bigger impact on the success of your product.

Active Users

This includes daily active users (DAUs) and monthly active users (MAUs). How many people are actively using the product within a time-span? At Mozilla, we’ve been using these for a long time. From what I’ve read, these metrics seem less important when compared to some of the other metrics, but they do provide a somewhat easy to measure indicator of activity.

These metrics don’t give a good indication of how much people use the product though. I have seen a variation metric called DAU/MAU (daily divided by monthly) and gives something like retention or engagement. DAU/MAU rates of 50% are seen as very good.

Engagement

This metric focuses on how much people really use the product, typically tracking the duration of session length or time spent using the application. The amount of time people spend in the product is an indication of stickiness. Engagement can also help increase retention. Mozilla collects data on session length now, but we need to start associating metrics like this with some of our experiments to see if certain features improve stickiness and keep people using the application.

We look for differences across various facets like locales and releases, and hopefully soon, across A/B experiments.

Retention / Churn

Based on what I’ve seen, this is the most important category of metrics. There are variations in how these metrics can be defined, but they cover the same goal: Keep users coming back to use your product. Again, looking across facets, like locales, can provide deeper insight.

Rolling Retention: % of new users return in the next day, week, month
Fixed Retention: % of this week’s new users still engaged with the product over successive weeks.
Churn: % of users who leave divided by the number of total users

Most analysis tools, like iTunes Connect and Google Analytics, use Fixed Retention. Mozilla uses Fixed Retention with our internal tools.

I found some nominal guidance (grain of salt required):
1-week churn: 80% bad, 40% good, 20% phenomenal
1-week retention: 25% baseline, 45% good, 65% great

Cost per Install (CPI)

I have also seen this called Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC), but it’s basically the cost (mostly marketing or pay-to-play pre-installs) of getting a person to install a product. I have seen this in two forms: blended – where ‘installs’ are both organic and from campaigns, and paid – where ‘installs’ are only those that come from campaigns. It seems like paid CPI is the better metric.

Lower CPI is better and Mozilla has been using Adjust with various ad networks and marketing campaigns to figure out the right channel and the right messaging to get Firefox the most installs for the lowest cost.

Lifetime Value (LTV)

I’ve seen this defined as the total value of a customer over the life of that customer’s relationship with the company. It helps determine the long-term value of the customer and can help provide a target for reasonable CPI. It’s weird thinking of “customers” and “value” when talking about people who use Firefox, but we do spend money developing and marketing Firefox. We also get revenue, maybe indirectly, from those people.

LTV works hand-in-hand with churn, since the length of the relationship is inversely proportional to the churn. The longer we keep a person using Firefox, the higher the LTV. If CPI is higher than LTV, we are losing money on user acquisition efforts.

Total Addressable Market (TAM)

We use this metric to describe the size of a potential opportunity. Obviously, the bigger the TAM, the better. For example, we feel the TAM (People with kids that use Android tablets) for Family Friendly Browsing is large enough to justify doing the work to ship the feature.

Net Promoter Score (NPS)

We have seen this come up in some surveys and user research. It’s suppose to show how satisfied your customers are with your product. This metric has it’s detractors though. Many people consider it a poor value, but it’s still used quiet a lot.

NPS can be as low as -100 (everybody is a detractor) or as high as +100 (everybody is a promoter). An NPS that is positive (higher than zero) is felt to be good, and an NPS of +50 is excellent.

Go Forth!

If you don’t track any of these metrics for your applications, you should. There are a lot of off-the-shelf tools to help get you started. Level-up your engineering game and make a bigger impact on the success of your application at the same time.

Fun With Telemetry: URL Suggestions

Firefox for Android has a UI Telemetry system. Here is an example of one of the ways we use it.

As you type a URL into Firefox for Android, matches from your browsing history are shown. We also display search suggestions from the default search provider. We also recently added support for displaying matches to previously entered search history. If any of these are tapped, with one exception, the term is used to load a search results page via the default search provider. If the term looks like a domain or URL, Firefox skips the search results page and loads the URL directly.

fennec-suggestions-annotated

  1. This suggestion is not really a suggestion. It’s what you have typed. Tagged as user.
  2. This is a suggestion from the search engine. There can be several search suggestions returned and displayed. Tagged as engine.#
  3. This is a special search engine suggestion. It matches a domain, and if tapped, Firefox loads the URL directly. No search results page. Tagged as url
  4. This is a matching search term from your search history. There can be several search history suggestions returned and displayed. Tagged as history.#

Since we only recently added the support for search history, we want to look at how it’s being used. Below is a filtered view of the URL suggestion section of our UI Telemetry dashboard. Looks like history.# is starting to get some usage, and following a similar trend to engine.# where the first suggestion returned is used more than the subsequent items.

Also worth pointing out that we do get a non-trivial amount of url situations. This should be expected. Most search keyword data released by Google show that navigational keywords are the most heavily used keywords.

An interesting observation is how often people use the user suggestion. Remember, this is not actually a suggestion. It’s what the person has already typed. Pressing “Enter” or “Go” would result in the same outcome. One theory for the high usage of that suggestion is it provides a clear outcome: Firefox will search for this term. Other ways of trigger the search might be more ambiguous.

telemetry-suggestions

Firefox for Android: What’s New in v35

The latest release of Firefox for Android is filled with new features, designed to work with the way you use your mobile device.

Search

Search is the most common reason people use a browser on mobile devices. To help make it easier to search using Firefox, we created the standalone Search application. We have put the features of Firefox’s search system into an activity that can more easily be accessed. You no longer need to launch the full browser to start a search.

When you want to start a search, use the new Firefox Widget from the Android home screen, or use the “swipe up” gesture on the Android home button, which is available on devices with software home buttons.

fennec-swipeup

Once started, just start typing your search. You’ll see your search history, and get search suggestions as you type.

fennec-search-1-crop

The search results are displayed in the same activity, but tapping on any of the results will load the page in Firefox.

fennec-search-3

Your search history is shared between the Search and Firefox applications. You have access to the same search engines as in Firefox itself. Switching search engines is easy.

Sharing

Another cool feature is the Sharing overlay. This feature grew out of the desire to make Firefox work with the way you use mobile devices. Instead of forcing you to switch away from applications when sharing, Firefox gives you a simple overlay with some sharing actions, without leaving the current application.

fennec-share-overlay

You can add the link to your bookmarks or reading list. You can also send the link to a different device, via Firefox Sync. Once the action is complete, you’re back in the application. If you want to open the link, you can tap the Firefox logo to open the link in Firefox itself.

Synced Tabs

Firefox Sync makes it easy to access your Firefox data across your different devices, including getting to the browser tabs you have open elsewhere. We have a new Synced Tabs panel available in the Home page that lets you easily access open tabs on other devices, making it simple to pick up where you left off.

Long-tap an item to easily add a bookmark or share to another application. You can expand/collapse the device lists to manage the view. You can even long-tap a device and hide it so you won’t see it again!

fennec-synctabs

Improved Error Pages

No one is happy when an error page appears, but in the latest version of Firefox the error pages try to be a bit more helpful. The page will look for WiFi problems and also allow you to quickly search for a problematic address.

fennec-errorpage-search

Firefox for Android: Collecting and Using Telemetry

Firefox 31 for Android is the first release where we collect telemetry data on user interactions. We created a simple “event” and “session” system, built on top of the current telemetry system that has been shipping in Firefox for many releases. The existing telemetry system is focused more on the platform features and tracking how various components are behaving in the wild. The new system is really focused on how people are interacting with the application itself.

Collecting Data

The basic system consists of two types of telemetry probes:

  • Events: A telemetry probe triggered when the users takes an action. Examples include tapping a menu, loading a URL, sharing content or saving content for later. An Event is also tagged with a Method (how was the Event triggered) and an optional Extra tag (extra context for the Event).
  • Sessions: A telemetry probe triggered when the application starts a short-lived scope or situation. Examples include showing a Home panel, opening the awesomebar or starting a reading viewer. Each Event is stamped with zero or more Sessions that were active when the Event was triggered.

We add the probes into any part of the application that we want to study, which is most of the application.

Visualizing Data

The raw telemetry data is processed into summaries, one for Events and one for Sessions. In order to visualize the telemetry data, we created a simple dashboard (source code). It’s built using a great little library called PivotTable.js, which makes it easy to slice and dice the summary data. The dashboard has several predefined tables so you can start digging into various aspects of the data quickly. You can drag and drop the fields into the column or row headers to reorganize the table. You can also add filters to any of the fields, even those not used in the row/column headers. It’s a pretty slick library.

uitelemetry-screenshot-crop

Acting on Data

Now that we are collecting and studying the data, the goal is to find patterns that are unexpected or might warrant a closer inspection. Here are a few of the discoveries:

Page Reload: Even in our Nightly channel, people seem to be reloading the page quite a bit. Way more than we expected. It’s one of the Top 2 actions. Our current thinking includes several possibilities:

  1. Page gets stuck during a load and a Reload gets it going again
  2. Networking error of some kind, with a “Try again” button on the page. If the button does not solve the problem, a Reload might be attempted.
  3. Weather or some other update-able page where a Reload show the current information.

We have started projects to explore the first two issues. The third issue might be fine as-is, or maybe we could add a feature to make updating pages easier? You can still see high uses of Reload (reload) on the dashboard.

Remove from Home Pages: The History, primarily, and Top Sites pages see high uses of Remove (home_remove) to delete browsing information from the Home pages. People do this a lot, again it’s one of the Top 2 actions. People will do this repeatably, over and over as well, clearing the entire list in a manual fashion. Firefox has a Clear History feature, but it must not be very discoverable. We also see people asking for easier ways of clearing history in our feedback too, but it wasn’t until we saw the telemetry data for us to understand how badly this was needed. This led us to add some features:

  1. Since the History page was the predominant source of the Removes, we added a Clear History button right on the page itself.
  2. We added a way to Clear History when quitting the application. This was a bit tricky since Android doesn’t really promote “Quitting” applications, but if a person wants to enable this feature, we add a Quit menu item to make the action explicit and in their control.
  3. With so many people wanting to clear their browsing history, we assumed they didn’t know that Private Browsing existed. No history is saved when using Private Browsing, so we’re adding some contextual hinting about the feature.

These features are included in Nightly and Aurora versions of Firefox. Telemetry is showing a marked decrease in Remove usage, which is great. We hope to see the trend continue into Beta next week.

External URLs: People open a lot of URLs from external applications, like Twitter, into Firefox. This wasn’t totally unexpected, it’s a common pattern on Android, but the degree to which it happened versus opening the browser directly was somewhat unexpected. Close to 50% of the URLs loaded into Firefox are from external applications. Less so in Nightly, Aurora and Beta, but even those channels are almost 30%. We have started looking into ideas for making the process of opening URLs into Firefox a better experience.

Saving Images: An unexpected discovery was how often people save images from web content (web_save_image). We haven’t spent much time considering this one. We think we are doing the “right thing” with the images as far as Android conventions are concerned, but there might be new features waiting to be implemented here as well.

Take a look at the data. What patterns do you see?

Here is the obligatory UI heatmap, also available from the dashboard:
uitelemetry-heatmap